Why is Climate Science different?

Agree to Disagree

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Why is Climate Science different?


 

Why is Climate Science different?

Climate science is probably the only branch of science, that doesn’t look at absolute measurements.

Climate science looks mostly at temperature anomalies.

To calculate temperature anomalies, you need to use absolute temperatures.

But Climate science then ignores the absolute temperatures, and concentrates on the temperature anomalies.

Why?

There is nothing wrong with looking at temperature anomalies. For some things, temperature anomalies are the best thing to use.

But why ignore the absolute temperatures, that have already been determined (there is no extra work needed to get the absolute temperatures).

Consider the following analogies:

1) If you wanted to look at how wealthy people are, then you wouldn’t only look at their income (a relative measurement), you would also look at their assets (an absolute measurement).

2) If a doctor looks at your blood pressure, then they don’t only look at the change from the last time that they measured it (a relative measurement), they also consider whether your blood pressure is high or low (an absolute measurement).

Why is Climate Science different?

Climate scientists, and Alarmists, want to make MAJOR changes to the way that humans live.

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.

Climate scientists, and Alarmists, must produce top quality evidence, to show that these changes are necessary.

But they refuse to look at absolute temperatures.

Why?

I have actual absolute temperature data, for 216 countries. For each country, I have:

1) the temperature of the average coldest month (winter)

2) the temperature of the average month

3) the temperature of the average hottest month (summer)

For this article, I have sorted the data by the temperature of the average month.


There are 2 other important absolute temperatures, that you should know about:

1) the average temperature of the land (averaged by area, for 216 countries), is 15.6 degrees Celsius (this is the red line on the graph)

2) the average temperature that humans live at (averaged over the total population of the Earth), is 19.7 degrees Celsius (this is the blue line on the graph)

On the graph, each country is plotted as a rectangle.

The height of the rectangle goes from the temperature of the coldest month, to the temperature of the hottest month.

The width of the rectangle is the population of the country.

Let us look at an example. Find the yellow label which says “China”, and locate the large rectangle, above the label.

That large rectangle is China.

The temperature of China’s coldest month is about -2.0 degrees Celsius.

The temperature of China’s hottest month is about +30.3 degrees Celsius.

The grey line about half way up the rectangle, is China’s average temperature. For China, this is about +15.0 degrees Celsius.

The population of China is about 1,420,062,022 (look at the width of the rectangle).


Humans love the temperature to be warmer than the average land temperature. They choose to live in warmer places.

There is plenty of cooler land around. Humans don’t want to live on the cooler land.

But global warming will make the cooler land, warmer. It might become desirable.

Countries with a lot of “cool” land, like Russia and Canada, will probably become the next world superpowers.

I suggest that you learn to speak Russian, or Canadian.

 

Temperature and Population by Country - average

 

Why are actual absolute temperatures important?

Look at Russia. There are about 144 million people in Russia. Look at their absolute temperatures:

1) the temperature of Russia’s average hottest month (summer), is +22.8 degrees Celsius.

2) the temperature of Russia’s average month, is +0.2 degrees Celsius (only just above the freezing point of water)

3) the temperature of Russia’s average coldest month (winter), is -21.1 degrees Celsius.


Or look at Canada. There are about 37 million people in Canada. Look at their absolute temperatures:

1) the temperature of Canada’s average hottest month (summer), is +23.5 degrees Celsius.

2) the temperature of Canada’s average month, is +4.1 degrees Celsius (a bit cold for me)

3) the temperature of Canada’s average coldest month (winter), is -15.0 degrees Celsius.


Can you see why “real” absolute temperatures are important?

Temperature anomalies are also important.

You shouldn’t ignore either of them.

If you want to see the temperature of the average coldest month (winter), the average month, and the average hottest month (summer), for all of the 216 countries, then look at this article:

https://agree-to-disagree.com/how-hot-is-that-country


I don’t think that anybody disagrees about what a “real” temperature is (compared to what a temperature anomaly is).

Alarmists are not claiming that they look at “real” temperatures. They seem to be proud of the fact, that they NEVER look at “real” temperatures.

That seems wrong to me.

Does it seem wrong to you?

[ If you think that ignoring absolute temperatures seems wrong, then please consider buying me a coffee (see below). ]

[ If you think that ignoring absolute temperatures is ok, then please consider buying me 2 coffees (see below). ]


I hope that you enjoyed reading this article. If you think that this article is interesting and enjoyable, then please consider “buying me a coffee”. There is a button at the top and bottom of each webpage. A coffee costs exactly $5.00 (USD). If you are a caffeine addict, you can buy me more than one coffee. Don’t tell my boss, but I work harder on my website, than I do on my day job. I don’t get paid anything for the work that I do on my website. And I have to pay for domain name registration, the WordPress monthly fee, etc. I decided to make my website Ad-Free, to keep it uncluttered, and more readable. I created my website, because I enjoy investigating global warming, and I want people to know the truth. I don’t think that we are being told the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.

 

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